Hipster douchebags: A story in five posts

Sometimes, mocking hipsters for being identical brings out just as much conformity in the critics of this so-called group.

We all have “types” or particular characteristics to which we gravitate towards in others; the dame below just happens to be into a certain gent. Whether he is indeed just like “every douchebag in the joint” is unknown, but relying on a mere five physical descriptors, sure – it’s easy to think “they” are all the same, while “we” are beautiful & unique snowflakes, right?

[Side note: why not just have a “pants-free dance party?” That’s definitely got to be a thing. I saw it happen at a minimum of one party in Waterloo. Is Waterloo secretly hipper than Toronto?]

Hipsters make an easy scapegoat for the ills of the city – since no one really identifies as a hipster, it’s easy to call out others and accuse them of ruining such-and-such venue with their presence. The hipster penchant for exclusivity is perhaps best highlighted in the case of standing in a ridiculously long line to see the White Stripes, circa June 2002. My friend scornfully eyed the “poseur” fans and jadedly stated of the White Stripes, “Psshht. They were indie when *I* bought the tickets.”

As the Groucho Marx saying goes, more or less, hipsters would refuse to belong to any club that would have them as members. There’s ample credible and comedic work to support this assertion.

In any case, plaid-wearing, skinny jeans-clad “douchebags” are realistically part of the current social fabric of our city, as are King West partiers, DINKS, and Rob Ford. We don’t have to like any of ’em, but for the most part, we live in a city where each group has some geographic and psychological space to claim individual identities – regardless of whether their clothing is coordinated or not.

 

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One Response to Hipster douchebags: A story in five posts

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention Hipster douchebags: A story in five posts | lust & found -- Topsy.com

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